OGC Press Releases

OGC seeks comment on new working group focused on disseminating lightweight “datacubes”

Release Date: 
2014-11-20
Contact: 

info@opengeospatial.org

Content: 

20 November 2014 – The OGC seeks comment on the charter for a new OGC Standards Working Group (SWG) being formed to develop an OGC standard for disseminating relatively small “tiles” of geospatial data to lightweight devices. This group will also define in detail how existing widely used OGC standards can be used to support data tiling functionality.

Mobile computing has become pervasive in most parts of the world. The OGC Web Coverage Tile Service (“WC Tiles”) SWG will address the needs of users who need timely, compact, geospatial data or data products for their location or point of interest and for whom the overheads of other geospatial service interfaces may be too demanding of their mobile devices’ computing resources, battery life or bandwidth.

The new standard will be directly analogous to the OGC Web Map Tile Service, which provides for downloading tiles of pre-formatted image tiles to a client device on demand. Those images are encoded in the relatively simple image formats commonly used in websites. OGC Web Coverage Tiling Service ‘data cubes’ will be able to transfer virtually any type of complex spatial data, such as multi-dimensional atmospheric or ocean data, hyperspectral Earth images or even vector geometry.

The draft charter for the OGC Web Coverage Tile Service Standards Working Group is available at   https://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/?artifact_id=60231. Send comments on the charter to charter-requests [at] opengeospatial.org.

The 30 day public comment period ends 20 December 2014. After the ad hoc group seeking to form the new SWG has addressed comments received in response to this Request for Comments (RFC) the draft charter will be submitted to the OGC Technical Committee and Planning Committee for their review and likely approval.

The OGC® is an international consortium of more than 495 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.

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The OGC adopts GML in JPEG 2000 (“GMLJP2”) Encoding Standard Version 2

Release Date: 
2014-11-19
Contact: 

info@opengeospatial.org

Content: 

19 November 2014 - The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC®) has adopted the OGC GML in JPEG 2000 Encoding Standard (Part 1 - Core) (GMLJP2) version 2.

In 2006 the OGC published Version 1.0 of GMLJP2 to address problems encountered when attempting to have satellite images fit to Earth coordinate systems and "match up" to other sources of geospatial information. These are difficult problems because there are many sources of both Earth images and geospatial information, all with different coordinate reference information. GMLJP2 version 2 is the latest in a series of interrelated standards that have come into wide use in various application domains that use imagery.

JPEG 2000 is an image compression format widely used to store and transport imagery. The OGC Geography Markup Language (GML) is a widely used XML (eXtensible Markup Language) encoding for the transport and storage of geographic information, including vector data and non-spatial properties of geographic features. The GMLJP2 geospatial data encoding standard defines how the OGC Geography Markup Language (GML) is to be used within JPEG 2000 images for adding geographic content to imagery.  

GMLJP2 Version 2 eliminates shortcomings of Version 1 and also addresses shortcomings of competing methods of using JPEG2000 in geospatial applications.

Standards organizations cooperate in the continual improvement and updating of the international open standards that provide a platform for seamless service-based publishing, discovery, assessment, ordering, access and processing of geospatial information. This suite of standards evolves to keep up with evolving application requirements and the world's evolving Information Technology ecosystem. The OGC will announce another standard related to GMLJP2  – “GMLCOV for JPEG2000” – in 2015. GMLCOV for JPEG2000 will support improved interoperability and integration and address a more varied set of spatial data types and applications.

All OGC standards are free and publicly available on the OGC Standards Page. You can view the GML in JPEG 2000 (GMLJP2) Encoding Standard version 2 at http://docs.opengeospatial.org/is/08-085r4/08-085r4.html.  

The OGC® is an international consortium of more than 495 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.

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OGC Supports European Data Modelling Workshop

Release Date: 
2014-11-18
Contact: 

info@opengeospatial.org

Content: 

18 November 2014. The Open Geospatial Consortium joins EUROSDR, AGILE, JRC and ELF in presenting an important technical workshop focused on the geospatial elements of data models.The workshop will be held from 28 January (noon) to 30 January (noon) at the Danish Geodata Agency, Copenhagen, Denmark.

National Mapping and Cadastral Agencies and other spatial data infrastructure (SDI) content providers are facing increasing demand for making well documented data in known data models available as standardised web-services. National e-government initiatives require spatial data to be modelled seamlessly with non-spatial data. INSPIRE puts requirements on GML application schemas and web service standards, and the European Location Framework (ELF) project brings the national SDIs together in a Pan-European context.

Data modelling is a mature discipline, but how best to handle a number of specific modelling issues such as semantic mediation for cross community collaboration is challenging. The potential benefits of solving such issues for automating implementation of data distribution and sharing environments is obvious. However, many considerations need to be taken into account when defining and agreeing to the data model. In addition, automating the process of implementing instances database schemas and web-services based on UML data models adds an extra level of complexity.

The workshop aims at identifying challenges in order to identify relevant research topics and encourage development of best practice recommendations.

Registration

Please register via: http://www.geonovum.nl/workshop-eurosdr

Call for abstracts

Participants in this workshop are invited to give a presentation on one or more of the topics described on the workshop web page. 300-500 word abstracts can be sent to j.e.stoter [at] tudelft.nl, by 12 noon, 12th of December 2014. The abstracts will be used to organize the programme. Improved versions or full papers will not be requested for the workshop.

About the workshop sponsors

EuroSDR is a not-for-profit organisation linking National Mapping and Cadastral Agencies with Research Institutes and Universities in Europe for the purpose of applied research in spatial data provision, management and delivery.

The Association of Geographic Information Laboratories for Europe (AGILE) was established in 1998 to promote academic teaching and research on GIS at the European level and to ensure the continuation of the networking activities that have emerged as a result of the EGIS Conferences and the European Science Foundation GISDATA Scientific Programmes.

The Joint Research Centre (JRC) is the European Commission's in-house science service which employs scientists to carry out research in order to provide independent scientific advice and support to EU policy.

The 3-year ELF Project is supported by a consortium of 30 partners across Europe, whose work is co-funded by the European Commission. The goal of the ELF project is to deliver the European Location Framework (ELF) required to provide up-to-date, authoritative, interoperable, cross-border, reference geo-information for use by the European public and private sectors.

The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is an international consortium of more than 495 companies, government agencies, research organizations, and universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geospatial standards. OGC Standards support interoperable solutions that "geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services and mainstream IT. Visit the OGC website at http://www.opengeospatial.org/.

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